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    Hello world!

    Published on September 6, 2012 by in News

    Welcom

     

    Welcome to JayTMedia!  I’m Jay and will be your goto guy for all your computer questions.  I’m looking at building this site around my day to day help.  I’m an IT Manager/sysADMIN for a global company.  I run my own department and have only one employee working for me.. ME.  The company I work for has over 6 servers, 200+ desktop pc’s, 100+ laptops, 200+ printers, copiers, fax, cellphones, iPads, cameras and so much more.  I deal with a lot of IO errors on any given day.

    I will be sharing some of my knowledge with you and if you would like to see something here on my site… let me know.

    -Jay

     

    640x330_JayT-blueandgold

     
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    How to spot a phishing email

    Published on July 24, 2018 by in News

    I get hundreds of emails a day, from users, vendors, network devices, email chains, and jokes.  Sometimes it’s hard for us to take a minute to verify the email is real or fake.  I’m going to try and explain how to spot a phishing email or fake email.

    Let’s use a recent example from Microsoft to an end-user here at work.

     

    The first thing I noticed was the reply address was ms.com.  Seems legit, but ms.com is really owned by Morgan Stanley.  To check the domain that an email is from you can google “who is ms.com” or you can go to http://www.whois.com/ and search the domain.  Sometimes they will use a legit email address and you will have to dig a little deeper.

    I notice instead of the sender using the end-users full name, they use the users email address.  That is a giveaway that the sender is using a script and has no clue to whom they are sending the email to.

    Next I notice a link that says RESOLVE ISSUE NOW.  Do not click!  Move your mouse over the link and it will show you the links path.

    Now that you can see the path, note the url “pje.co.id”.  That does not look like a legit path to Microsoft.  Again you can do a Whois on that domain and you will see that it does not belong to Microsoft.

    Let’s say you clicked on the link.  I can see that the link has the users email address included and once the user clicks the link, it will take the user to page that resembles a login page for Microsoft.  The user will see that their email address is already entered and the password field is blank.  The user will then enter the password and clicks submit.  Nothing happened, yes it did!  Once you entered your password and hit enter or clicked submit… the sender was able to obtain your username and password to your email.

    OK so the sender now has your email password.  What do you do?  Change your password or call your friendly neighborhood IT Guy.

    This type of phishing can be used to steal your Facebook and Bank passwords as well.

    Have a nice day,

    Your Friendly Neighborhood IT Guy!

    Jay

     
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    The Phone Case

    Published on October 1, 2015 by in News

    So my Lifeproof Fre case broke. The button cover came unsealed and I had noticed a little moisture around the edge of the finger print button. After removing the case I noticed the cover (very thin piece of plastic) was no longer attached and the back cover was warped. I decided to call Lifeproof and after a short hold and an email to send photos of my case they sent me a conformation that they are rush shipping me a new Lifeproof Fre v2 case. Now that’s what I call customer service.

    I ran and bought a Speck case so I would have some protection while I wait on my new #Lifeproof case. I swear by the Lifeproof case and will always trust my phones with one. Now as for the Speck case. Very nice form fitting, not at all bulky, has great protection, not any protection from dust, water, or any screen protection besides for the raised bumpers, but a great case for the price.

    If you do not need dust or water protection I would diffidently go with the Speck. It has great drop protection with its military grade plastic and rubber cushioning…. And it’s half the price of a Lifeproof case.

    If you want full protection from all the elements and built in screen protection… I highly recommend the Lifeproof!

    It would be nice if one day the iPhone was built with all this protection in mind. They spend millions of dollars in R&D to create one of the nicest phone designs just to have the consumer cover them up with a case. Come on Apple! I’m not going to leave the Android users out… The Galaxy phone line is remarkably beautiful and they have taken steps to build more durable phone shells and even water resistant.

    Whatever phone you have is a very large investment and should be treated with care. So stop buying those cheap ass cellphone cases in the middle of the mall and invest in a few extra bucks in a Lifeproof or Speck. Sorry Otterbox, but your plastic and rubber loses shape and strength in just a few weeks and I would not own another Otterbox.

    Have a nice day and thanks for reading.

    Your friendly neighborhood IT Guy,
    -jT.

     
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    New Ransomware Malware takes Advantage of Windows PowerShell

    Published on June 4, 2014 by in News

    New Ransomware Malware takes Advantage of Windows PowerShell.

     
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    CryptoLocker

    Published on October 21, 2013 by in News

     

    !!VIRUS WARNING!!
    CryptoLocker ransomware

     

     As you may already know, there is a SERIOUS virus going around which encrypts all your office documents and other important files. It’s called Crypto Locker. Be extremely careful opening email attachments. DO NOT OPEN ANY ATTACHMENTS unless you are 100% positive you know what it is even if you are expecting an email with an attachment. This virus can be spread by other people’s infected computer sending emails without their knowledge. The attachments are coming in several different formats, some examples are: UPS tracking information, Intuit review, late payment please review attachment .doc .xls .ppt .eps .ai .jpg .srw .cer .DO NOT OPEN.

     

    This virus causes irreversible damage unless you pay the ransom which is anywhere from $100-$300 paid via green dot moneypak cards.

     

    DO NOT OPEN ANY ATTACHMENTS unless you are 1000% positive you know what it is. Even if you are expecting an email with an attachment, contact the sender to be sure they sent it as these viruses can be spread by other people’s computer being infected and emails being sent without their knowledge.

     

    Remember, this encryption is IRREVERSIBLE without paying the ransom and once the timer runs out, your files will NOT be recoverable. The ONLY other way to recover them is to have cold storage backups. This virus can infect all hot backups and other computers on network shares. The virus does the damage to your system BEFORE it alerts you that you are infected and demands a ransom payment.

     

    Please be careful!

     

    Thank you,
    Jay
    “Your Friendly Neighborhood IT Guy”

     

     

     

     
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    How to remove FBI viruses – Fake FBI malware removal FBI ransomware | Malware Removal – Software & Tutorials

    How to remove FBI viruses – Fake FBI malware removal FBI ransomware | Malware Removal – Software & Tutorials.

     

    The FBI Moneypak virus may cause Antivirus software to malfunction. Anti Malware and Antivirus programs can be used to scan and remove the FBI Moneypak virus but in many scenarios the infection has progressed far enough to disable removal software. There are steps around this, such as entering your system in safe mode or restoring your computer, unplugging from the internet, denying flash, using the optical disk drive option, safe mode with networking, or slaving your HDD.

     
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    Nice Find – TechSupport Info

    How to Clean An Infected Computer.

    How to Harden Your Browser Against Malware and Privacy Concerns

     
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    Scam Alert

    I just had a call from one of my users at the office who told me they were contacted by a company to be acting on behalf of Microsoft and that their computer was infested with viruses and that they were instructed to help.

    The caller had my user do something in the DOS prompt, from what I gather it was just to do a dir listing to make it look as if those files were infected.

    They then wanted him to download a remote access client from ammyy.com and this is where he became suspicious and said he did not have time and would have to call back.

    The company acting on behalf of Microsoft gave my user a bogus 800 number and an MS employee id.

    They’re using social engineering techniques to scare people and then gain access to the user’s pc and network.  I can see a lot of vulnerable people being caught by this.  This technique of social engineering is a technique I myself have practiced for years to help others protect themselves from scammers.  I can go on, on how easy it is for me to talk to a user for less than 5 minutes and be able to gain full access to the user’s pc.  This is a serious problem and most corporate networks are hacked and destroyed by social engineering.

    Beware that this scam is out there and if you have friends or family who may not be completely technically savvy it may bite them in the rear.

    Remember:

    1. Anyone can dial a number and claim to be someone else;
    2. The real Microsoft doesn’t call their customers to report virus infections;
    3. Never run any unknown program or install any remote access tool for someone unless
      you are 100% certain of their identity and trustworthiness.
    4. Never give out your password
    5. Never use passwords that are in the dictionary… password, god, love, money
    6. Use upper and lower case letters, number and special characters…  1mL337, p@s5w0Rd!

    From your friendly neighborhood IT Guy! – JayT

    Download this post in PDF and share.

     
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    How to fix Error 1402.

    So today I had a user get a MBR.Rootkit!  After getting the dang thing removed I was, hit with an Error 1402.  I was able to get this fixed by following the steps listed in the link below.

    How to fix ‘Error 1402. Could not open key: UNKNOWN…’.

     

     

     
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    Your User Profile was not loaded correctly in Terminal Server

    When logging into a terminal server it brings up the

    “Your User Profile was not loaded correctly”

    You have been logged on with a temporary profile

    This could be caused by the following

    1) If you are logging in using an active directory account, make sure the profile Tab in the Active Directory Settings under Users and Computers the Profile Path is set correctly

    2) If the account is corrupted , log the user off and try and remove their account

    i) By right clicking on My Computer , Advanced System Settings, Advanced, then User Profiles removing via here

    ii) If the user is not displayed above ,

    Delete the User’s Folder from C:\Users\*Username* ( Backup any data before )

    Remove the Users Registry enteries from : HKLM\Software\WindowNT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

    Then try logging in again

     
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    New Logo

    Published on September 7, 2012 by in News

    Last night I worked on a new logo design and here it is…

     

     

     

     
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